Monthly Archives: February 2014

Science Snapshot: Celebrating Sixth Grade Students in STEM

Science Snapshot: Discovering Excellence in Arkansas

Arkansas Governor Beebe and the Museum of Discovery celebrated nearly 100 sixth grade students, their families, and teachers at a recent event, Discovery Excellence in Arkansas. Students represented schools from across the state. It was a busy evening – but a fantastic one!

Tagged , , , , ,

Favorite Childhood Museum Memory?

In keeping with the rebranded title of this blog, I thought I’d pose a question. What’s your favorite childhood museum memory?

Sometimes this moment acts as the catalyst which may drive folks into the field. For others, a favorite childhood museum memory is merely the first of countless, as they enjoy sites of heritage, art, and science throughout their lives as visitors and/or volunteers.

One of my favorite childhood museum memories is visiting the Swedish American Museum in Chicago, Illinois. Located mere feet from where some of my family were born and bred, the museum is located in the heart of a very Swedish neighborhood, Andersonville. I remember visiting this museum with my sister, mom, and grandma, and taking in the bright blues and yellows of the walls, exhibits, and museum store while fervently inhaling the smells of the Swedish bakery across the street. While short on actual content, the welcoming and warm impression that I got from the museum has stayed with me through today.

The Swedish American Museum is located in the heart of Andersonville, a Swedish neighborhood on North Clark Street in Chicago, Illinois.

The Swedish American Museum is located in the heart of Andersonville, a Swedish neighborhood on North Clark Street in Chicago, Illinois.

As museums work to create engaging and educational exhibitions, diverse programs, and special events, an important concept which event planners, programmers, administrators, etc.  keep in mind is the “tone” of the event. Visitors don’t need to come to the museum. Museums can’t force visitors through their doors (as much as some may want to…). For the most part, museums aim to create welcoming atmospheres of informal learning, where visitors are invited to explore, discover, and form a relationship with the museum. Whether the resulting relationship is a one-time visit, a yearlong membership, or a lifetime of dedication to the museum’s mission, the initial and lasting impressions that visitors get when visiting an institution may often stay with them, long after the content and facts may fade.

Side note:  I’ve since been back to the Swedish American Museum several times –  it’s fantastic. I can’t wait to return again. Perhaps in May this year, when we briefly return to tour the great state of Illinois…

Tagged , , , , , , ,

Kentucky Sink Hole Swallows Up 8 Classic Corvettes

A collection manager’s nightmare….Thinking positive thoughts for colleagues and those impacted by the sink hole at the National Corvette Museum.

Auto World Nation

Image courtesy of USA Today Image courtesy of USA Today

Yesterday, a gaping sinkhole swallowed up a number of classic cars at the National Corvette museum in Kentucky. In the past, this type of event may have been saved for a science fiction novel or some tall tale passed along through campfire conversations. But now, sink holes seem to be more and more prevalent, a new story popping up every few weeks.

According to museum officials, the Kentucky Corvette sink hole was detected yesterday at 5:45 a.m. when the museum’s motion sensors were alarmed. The sinkhole, which was 40 feet wide and 20 feet deep, devoured eight classic corvettes from the museum. According to museum spokeswoman Katie Frassinelli, “When you go in there, it’s unreal. The hole is so big, it makes the Corvettes look like little Matchbox cars.”

After hours of media speculation and coverage, onlookers and people close to the museum are…

View original post 306 more words

Science Snapshot: Artifact Experiences

Recently I proposed, planned, and implemented a new visitor experience program at the museum, “Artifact Experiences.” In an effort to interpret our collection (of +1,500 objects!), “Artifact Experiences” seeks to curate temporary, facilitated displays of artifacts from the museum’s collection that connect with a temporary exhibition, special event, or program. Since becoming a more hands-on science center, the museum’s collection is largely otherwise uninterpreted to the public. Combining my museum collections and education background, this program seeks to safely and carefully interpret the collection as appropriate. I created temporary object labels to specifically connect with the new exhibit, Tech City. I also placed the objects on muslin cloth during their temporary display. 

At all times carefully facilitated by museum staff, interested visitors had the opportunity to don gloves for a careful hands-on exploration. I also provided mini-magnifying glasses for curious eyes to get a closer inspection. The display offered visitors an entirely new opportunity to connect with the museum’s collection and mission, and I had a lot of great questions and enthusiasm from visitors. 

This Friday, February 7th I kicked off the new program with a small display connecting to the new exhibtion in our WOW Gallery, Tech City. Focused on themes of industrialization, manufacturing, and communication (all key elements to a modern city, eh?), the temporary display highlighted a small sample of our truly awesome collection. 

Curated pieces included: 

  • An Automatic Fire Alarm Repeater (c.1899) 

  • Hallicrafters Model 505 Television (1948) 

  • Wooden Planer (c. 1850) 

  • Dalton Adding Machine (1912) 

    Image

    An Artifact Experience

     

    Any suggestions for this program as it continues to grow and evolve? I’m eager to continue to safely highlight our collection while continuing best practices. 

Tagged , , , , , ,

Still me – I promise!

 

Hello, all.

After some thought, I’ve revamped the Wunderkammers page. After a year, let’s consider this a birthday rebranding, of sorts. Rebranding – a name, logo, slogan – often comes with the fear of confusing audiences or may be associated with a change of management or mission. FEAR NOT! The mission of this blog remains the same: to highlight an emerging museum professional’s experiences, reflections, and inquiries. I will also continue to be at the helm. 

In addition to signifying a change in mission or management, rebranding also signifies an awareness of marketing and public image. Rebranding too often or without significant direction is when confusion arises. Last year the Whitney Museum made headlines with its minimalist logo and rebranding, completed after about ten years of its previous logo – a short time. The move to rebrand however coincides with the institution’s physical move and a massive construction project. After much consideration, while “Wunderkummers” (wonder rooms, cabinets of curiosity) still remain at the core of the blog, the title itself leaves a bit of room for confusion and interpretation. While museum geeks and enthusiasts may instantly recognize this – and many have! – I wanted to make the blog a bit more accessible, open. Another key factor in my rebranding was also my shift from graduate student to emerging professional, and physical shift in location.

Inspired by none other than Downton Abbey‘s favorite butler, Mr. Carson, I thought this quotation fit with my mission both as a museum professional and museum enthusiast: “The business of life is the acquisition of memories.” How…perfect. I believe this quotation reflects the mission of this blog, as well as highlights the mission of many a cultural institution – acquiring and interpreting artifacts, art, and ideas. 

To sum up: It’s still me. The title and font have changed, but the mission, writer, and, yes, URL, have remained the same. Questions? Ideas? I welcome them. 

What do you think? Do you agree with Mr. Carson? 

Image

                                     Mr. Carson knows all, really

Tagged , , , , ,