Tag Archives: Little Rock

Science Snapshot: Earth Day Pledge

Science Snapshot: Earth Day Pledge

This year to help mark Earth Day I developed a simple activity to encourage museum visitors to pledge to protect the planet. While Earth Day itself is Tuesday, April 22, I went ahead and facilitated this activity this past Saturday, in an effort to reach a wider demographic beyond our scheduled school field trips this next week.

With a blank canvas of the world (well, Western Hemisphere), visitors promised to protect the Earth with their unique finger prints using paint. I also provided some simple ways individuals and families can make a positive impact on the world – i.e. recycling, using rechargeable batteries, planting a garden or a tree, and bringing your own reusable bags to the grocery store etc. I was initially going to have handouts to share with families and visitors, but then that seemed fairly anti-Earth Day with all the extra paper. Instead, I had a couple of copies handy at the paint station. I also provided some wipes to help with the resulting mess. I wanted to avoid lots of blue, brown, and green finger prints all over the galleries! It was a quiet day at the museum, but I got a fair amount of participation. It was a good opportunity to have some conversation with our visitors, as well as be a visible presence on the gallery floor.

In the future, if I were to help orchestrate a similar activity, I would probably try and use stamp ink or a different type of paint. This paint was a little too thick, and some of my smaller participants were extra generous with their pledges! Another thing I may tweak to this specific project is to develop a larger canvas – or at least try and include a truly global map – including the Eastern Hemisphere as well. As always, my coworkers were awesome in helping craft this activity – from design assistance to actual fabrication!

What are you or your institution doing to help celebrate Earth Day 2014?

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Professional – and Personal – Development

Yesterday I was able to sneak out of the office (during my lunch break, it wasn’t that scandalous) and attend “Legacies & Lunch” a brown bag lecture series supported by the Arkansas Humanities Council. Hosted at the brand new Ron Robinson Theatre in the River Market District, the theatre was a mere hop, skip, and a jump away. The subject of the lecture was in keeping with Arkansas Archeology Month (this month!), and presented by the State Archeologist, Dr. Ann M. Early. With a presentation titled “Big News from Old Stuff” I was hooked even before I sat down. In a quick hour, Dr. Early explored the provenance of several collections within the University of Arkansas (Fayetteville) archeology museum collections – including some with ties to the museum. By focusing on a few key collections, Dr. Early helped tell the story of collections as a whole, as well as highlight significant historic archeology events in the state. Many of the local connections and archeology sites were new to me, and there were a few times when a physical map of Arkansas was presented as evidence where I was a bit confused (which river is that again?). Thank goodness Little Rock is located in the dead center of the state!

 Museum-Collections-Rack-Card

Attending the lecture was very fulfilling. Recently I have been feeling…a bit cut off from academia. Despite visiting several sites of informal learning in our new home, and taking advantage of the documentary selection available on Netflix, I have been missing the scholastic atmosphere of a classroom. You may recall I blogged about brown bag lectures last year around this time, when I was invited to present my own brown bag with the Illinois State Museum. I also miss the element of working with a research museum as well, I think. There is something engaging and invigorating about attending all-staff meetings and hearing about the latest publications from peers! Thankfully, there are several volunteer opportunities I am currently exploring in the area to keep myself professionally active and personally satisfied. I am also hopeful to take a stronger role in my alumni organization as a potential board member, and attend at least a couple of national conferences this year, in addition to other regional and local opportunities. Work is also very busy, with some new programs and events debuting as we brace for Spring Rush with oh so many field trips – never a dull moment. Should be a busy time!

What do you do – in or outside your workplace, to stay professionally active and satisfied? Is there even time? Some days there doesn’t seem to be enough hours in the day or energy left!

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Twister, anyone?

My sister is visiting from Chicago, so it has given me the chance play tourist with an actual tourist to the area. We’ve been able to visit serval fun stops in the last few days, including art galleries, historic sites, and probably too many restaurants. One of the places we’ve explored is the Historic Arkansas Museum. Part of the Department of Arkansas Heritage, the mission of the Historic Arkansas Museum (or H.A.M.) is to “communicate the early history of Arkansas and its creative legacy through preserving, interpreting, and presenting stories and collections for the education and enjoyment of the people we serve.”  

While at H.A.M. we enjoyed several of their permanent and temporary galleries, an orientation video, a tour of several historic homes, and the museum store. Accredited by the American Alliance of Museums, I was really impressed with my visit, and I can’t wait to return as a visitor – or perhaps a volunteer, if they’ll have me!

I wanted to take  a quick moment and highlight an awesome interactive we enjoyed at the Historic Arkansas Museum in a hands-on children’s gallery. 

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Arkansas Twister

I love this interactive.

It’s quickly identifiable to the popular game Twister, requires limited instruction, educational (left foot in Texarkana!), and definitely combats any museum fatigue. (There is seating nearby for caregivers or family members to watch players from a safe distance.) Throughout the rest of the galleries there are several hands-on opportunities – many digital and computer based, but something about this “Arkansas Twister” stood out to me. From an exhibits stance, the construction and fabrication of this seems fairly basic – as does the upkeep. From an educational perspective, the color, left v. right coordination, and map are all awesome aspects that are neatly included. Looking at this interactive further, I wondered about year of the map (my Arkansas state history is a bit rough…), but was very impressed about all these connections. And, it was 100% on mission.

What do you think? Are there any children’s exhibits that have stood out to you? Any that I should check out?  

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Raising the Bar

Happy 2014!

As I look forward to the New Year and all its rich and exciting possibilities, I wanted to take a moment to recognize some major personal professional milestones that 2013 saw and outline some goals for the future. During the last year I….

  • Completed a competitive, yearlong internship

  • Successfully completed and defended my graduate exams 
  • Walked across the graduation stage and earned my Masters Degree

  •  Accepted a position – in a new state 

  •  Moved to said state and passed a probationary period of employment

  • Discovered a charming historic neighborhood we call “home,” for now  

While I continue to grow in my new position, and we continue to explore this new geographical region, I am going to make an effort to be more mindful of blogging and attempt a greater frequency of posts. Easier said than done, correct?

Another goal I am keen to pursue is to volunteer more. While living in Springfield I enjoyed volunteering with the arts association and public library, but now that I’m in a new town – it is time to expand my horizons. While I enjoy volunteering in my field – I consider this a great way to give back to a community AND grow, I am eager to volunteer in fields unrelated to my own.

One organization that I grew to really appreciate and respect last year is Optimist International. A volunteer with the ISM was highly involved with the Optimists, and I was able to present on behalf of the museum to this organization in July 2013. The mission of Optimist International is “By providing hope and positive vision, Optimists bring out the best in kids.” For more information, check out their website. While attending the organization’s meeting in July, I was struck by the positive attitude of its members and their dedication.  I look forward to exploring local branches of this organization, and seeking out similar volunteer opportunities. 

In addition to blogging and volunteering, I am also eager to travel. Through work I’ve been able to explore some of the immediate region through educational outreach. Beyond this though, I am eager for day-trips full of photography, winding roads, towns big and small, and seeing what exactly is unique to the so-called “Mid-South.” A few posts ago I made a list of cultural and historic sites of interest. I look forward to adding to this list.  

So, reader. What sort of organizations do you volunteer with? Any recommendations? Also – any adventurous tips for this Yankee? I look forward to pushing myself personally and professionally during this next year – to explore this new position and all the regional possibilities this area may offer.  

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It’s Elementry…

Hello, all. Since the last post in July I’ve stayed fairly busy in the field with an array of professional development opportunities and professional changes.

In July I was fortunate to attend the Association of Midwest Museums Conference in Madison, Wisconsin. Thanks to a conference and travel scholarship from the AMM, I was able to partake in a range of engaging panels on volunteer management, public programming, community partnerships, and much more. I was even able to meet up with some Historical Administration alumni and faculty. It was a great conference, and I was reminded how Madison is a wonderful city!

In August my position with the Illinois State Museum came to a close, and I accepted a new opportunity as Museum Educator with the Museum of Discovery in Little Rock, Arkansas. More on this exciting transition later!

On an unrelated note –

One thing I’m very excited about is the much-anticipated opening of The International Exhibition of Sherlock Holmes, due to open in October at the Oregon Museum of Science & Industry. This traveling exhibition will highlight the science behind the master of deduction’s crime solving skills, include period dioramas, and feature artifacts and props from popular depictions of the great detective. Needless to say, I’m excited.

Anyone want to fly me out to Portland?

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